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  Member4962

Acutally the 2016 brochure had the 3.6r rated for 3000 lbs and the 2.5 at 2700 both with Cvt transmissions. Maybe there were some warranty issues or claims against Subaru for them to change the ratings?
I agree that with sensible use either car can be used to tow within thier rated specs. That said most people do not really look at how much they are towing and weight alone is not the only factor to consider. The mass of the object being pulled and speed in steady state use can be equally taxing while weight is normally an issue with stopping and starting. Synethic oil provides more protection than before but you still can not overlook oil coolers for operation in the south or western states during the majority of the year.

Towing with a Subaru Outback 2.5i
  B787mech

Interesting. I wonder if the change from the 5eat (conventional auto) to the CVT accounts for the change in towing capacity or if they changed it when they updated the whole car?

An 1800lb camper ( or the 2700/3500lb rated weight) isn't really that heavy. Unless the OP is living in a hot climate or plans to tow more than a few times a year, I personally wouldn't be too concerned about the lack of an oil or transmission cooler.



Towing with a Subaru Outback 2.5i
  Member4962

I have both a 2.5 and 3.6 Outback and I see both models this year are rated at 2700lbs towing. The 3.6 has a upgrated CVT over the 2.5 and if I was to choose one over the other for towing it would be the 6. As a general rule more cylinders are always better regarding towing because of the duration between detonation. Neither model get upgrades for towing ie oil/transmission coolers so I would be reluctant to do much towing with either.
I like both cars but feel the 3.6 is more main stream and yes the difference in gas mileage is not that great although the 2.5 has best the 3.6 on trips when driven with gas mileage in mind.

Towing with a Subaru Outback 2.5i
  B787mech

I own a 2011 3.6R Outback with the 5eat automatic.

I use it for towing my utility trailer (approx 600-800lbs) loaded with my sled (another 600lbs or so) or hauling crap to the landfill etc . It hauls the load with no trouble at all. It has a 3500lb tow rating, so a pop-up trailer should not be a problem.

As for the cvt, I don't really know what they are like for towing but my gut feeling says avoid it.

Regarding the 4cyl vs 6cyl; I would say go with the 6. I know the 4 gets much better fuel economy on paper. However the real world penalty for the 6 is a lot smaller than you might think. I average 12L/100km (20mpg) in mixed driving and 9L/100km (26mpg) on two lane secondary roads. 8L/100km (29mpg) if I nurse it.

I test drove both before purchasing and found the 4cyl to be hopelessly underpowered and it was working hard the whole time. Whereas the 6cyl makes passing and merging a breeze and is just a very relaxed non-stressed engine overall.

Hope this helps!

Towing with a Subaru Outback 2.5i
  vonronge

IMHO, I wouldn't. The 2015 2.5 has a weaker version of the CVT than the 3.6. I have had no trouble, but I'm not willing to risk it.

Towing with a Subaru Outback 2.5i
  ricrichardson

I towed a similar camper for several years with my 2010 2.5. Never a problem towing. Certainly added to the stopping distance....hopefully yours has electric brakes.

Towing with a Subaru Outback 2.5i
  zcd1

We just bought a 2014 Acura RDX, and it would fit the needs you've listed nicely. They're easy to find in your price range.

It's powerful but relatively fuel-efficient, comfortable and should be EXTREMELY reliable - must more so than the Jeeps you're considering according to most sources, including TrueDelta.

All purpose/all weather city dweller w/highway hauling needs
  zcd1

The Outback sounds like a good fit.

Other good options would be the Honda CR-V or the Acura RDX

2017 search
  zcd1

The Kia Soul would be a great choice. Small outside, big inside, easy to maneouver, easy on gas, comfy.

next car
  Member3236

I agree with the others.

But when not driving for fun, you can hypermile and drive for economy. I do them both, the economy is when I tour cross country typically 1000mi trips and fun is usually short and fast slalom style which gets the worst mpg.

Average is 33 mpg in summer, 30 mpg in winter, link shows 40 tank fills graph.


https://forum.miata.net/vb/attachment.php?attachmentid=171833&d=1378390252

Note the newer ND MX5 gets over 38 mpg average.



are extended warranties worth the cost?
  jim

John F,

Makes sense.

Jim

are extended warranties worth the cost?
  John F

"I live in the Colorado mountains so would expect better mileage at a lower altitude."

Actually, at higher altitude there is less oxygen for the engine to breath (in non turbocharged cars). In order to not run too rich, the engine computer will dial back the fuel. The result is lower power, and better fuel economy (just like lifting your foot).

are extended warranties worth the cost?
  jim

I have had 4 miata's so far - all have been very reliable and no trouble. Two have had over 125,000 miles. One is a mega monster miata so that one doesn't count towards mileage.

The ones I have had are older (newest 2001) and I consitently get above 28 mpg and sometimes in the middle 30's. I live in the Colorado mountains so would expect better mileage at a lower altitude.
Maybe the older ones were lighter or gear ratio's different but I had decent mpg.

As I write this we are in the middle of a large snow storm but surprisingly the Miata is good until we get about 6", then the air dams become plows.

are extended warranties worth the cost?
  DarronS

If you check the reliability data here on True Delta you'll see the curent Acura RDX is only mid pack, while the Ford Edge fares better. The main problems with the Edge are rsale value and Ford dealers, which are hit or miss. I've owned several Fords over the years and the dealers have ranged from excellent to inexcusable poor. When I complained about the poor dealer to Ford customer service their answer was that the dealers are indepedent agents and Ford could do nothing to hlp me. Having worked at a Subaru dealer's service department I knew this was nonsense. If your local Ford dealer is good, and from my experience the good ones outnmber the bad, then the Edge may be a viable choice for you.

Retirement Vehicle For Active Life
  Member4266

I agree with the above posts.

I have a 2008 MX-5 PRHT and have had zero troubles with it. It is a solid car and I would certainly not buy any extra warranty for it. Just as others have pointed out, extended warranties are nothing but gimmicks designed to bilk money out of people. Just maintain the car with regular oil changes, brake flushes and other routine maintenance procedures.

I get about 28 mpg on average too. Yes, other modern 2.0 liter engine cars can give up to 35 to 40 mpg average. But, you'll in no way have the fun you get when driving a Miata. To create the wonderful sporty feel of the car, Mazda engineers have not tried to optimize fuel economy, but rather the total power output at different throttle settings.

are extended warranties worth the cost?
  MASTERNC

I haven't driven either new model, so I can't speak for one over the other. I did try the 2015 CX-5 before buying my CR-V- while I liked the way the CX-5 drove better, I ended up with the latter mainly because the interior was much better (down to leather on the front console box/armrest, versus plastic in the Mazda). Mazda upped the interior materials in the 2016 model (including adding leather to the armrest), and even more so with the latest version (especially the top trims). I think both offer compelling packages, but Mazda is supposed to be coming out with a diesel version at the end of this year. I drive a ton, so I am eyeing that to see how it turns out (and maybe that will be my next car if I like it enough).

2018 Honda CRV or 2018 Mazda CX5?
  Member4158

I bought my MX-5 in April 2008 and sold it this spring. I never had any repairs so for me an extended warranty would have been a waste of money. My car was an automatic. Driven at not too much over legal speeds I have gotten as much as 31 mpg with top up. Top down would not be as good. 28 was more normal. I always used high test, not regular gas. Alcohol-free gives better mileage.

are extended warranties worth the cost?
  Member3940

I think you need to drive the new CRV for a fair comparison. I think you will be shocked at how much they have improved since 2007. I have a 2016 EX-L with 26,000 troublefree miles on it and I like it a lot. If I had known of the many changes and improvements that the 2017 has, I would have waited.

I would lean toward the CRV because because they are so popular, replacement and aftermarket parts are more readily available and cheaper. It also has more space inside, gets better fuel economy and has a higher resale value.

2018 Honda CRV or 2018 Mazda CX5?
  John F

To expand a bit on apustac's comment; the reason for the Miata's gas mileage is that it has relatively low torque, and in order to produce good acceleration the gear ratios are set for performance rather than economy. While it may look to many like a "little economy car", it is in fact a sports car and Mazda made no attempt to maximize fuel economy at the expense of performance.

Like apustac, I don't know of any Miata that gets more than the high 20s in MPG (average). My two (1992 and 1995) average 28 consistently in mixed driving. If yours is getting less than that, and you are not in constant stop and go driving then I'd say maybe your oxygen sensor died and the car is running rich. Otherwise it's normal; put the top down, followed by your foot, and have fun.

are extended warranties worth the cost?
  apustac

An extended warrenty is seldom worth the paper it's written on. There are usually many restrictions and hoops to jump though in the event it is needed. Miatas' in particular are very reliable and should run for many happy miles with minimal attention (that is, oil changes as recommended, brake flush every couple of years, coolent change as recommended. Don't waste your money.

As far as milage, remember it is a sports car, not a Prius. I have never gotten more than high 20's in any of my Miatas.

Remember to enjoy the drive, they are wonderful little cars.

are extended warranties worth the cost?
  jasonmreece

Even though a 'luxury' brand name isn't important to you, the first recommedation that came to mind is the Acura RDX. It's technically considered a 'compact' luxury SUV, but it's on the large end of the compact size class. It's actually less than 6" shorter than your Nissan Murano. The interior space is vritutally identical with the RDX having 103 cubic feet vs. 105 for a Murano. So it's very similar in size.

There are three primary reasons that I think the RDX could be a good fit for you- Reliability, Size and Performance. The Reliability and Durability are both excellent, as expected from Honda/Acura products. The interior is very comfortable for four adults (it actually has 2" more rear seat legroom than a Murano). The front seats in general and the driver's seat in particular are comfortable even after several hours on the road. Best of all, there's a good ol' 279hp Honda V6 under the hood! It's good for 0-60 times in the low 6-second range, very quick among the SUV/CUV group. The 6-speed automatic almost seems like it can read you mind because it's always in the right gear and you'll never catch it flat footed. It's always ready to pass, merge or run for hours on end at 90mph on the rural interestate. =)

Another idea I wanted to toss out, though it may not interest you, is the new Mazda CX-9. It's a bit larger than your current vehicle (a 7-seater, although it makes a great 5-seater with a huge cargo area), but it handles and generally feels much smaller. It also has a turbocharged 4-cylinder, but the engine is tuned for 310lb-ft of torque at 2,000rpm, so it feels like a MUCH larger engine. The power delivery is so smooth that I had to look under the hood just to make sure it wasn't a V6. (BTW, in the interest of full disclosure, I own a previous-gen 2012 Mazda CX-9 and I love it). It's just a lot of car, both in size and features, for the money. The interior is near-luxury in terms of material and assembly quality and fuel economy is among the best in class.

My final suggestion is a bit 'safer' (some might say boring) and the reliability probably won't be any better than avearage- the Ford Edge. It's the only domestic-branded SUV/CUV that I could ever imagine buying. I would skip the standard 2.0L EcoBoost 4-cylinder for the 3.5L V6 though.

Good luck and hope this helps!

Retirement Vehicle For Active Life
  apacheone

The keyfob had a brand new Energizer battery installed... prior to all this... just in case it was a weak battery. Got two keyfobs off ebay, but, since I only received one fob when I bought the car...I wasted my time and money since I cannot "self" activate (remember you need two key fobs in order to program a third). There is only one "security system" on the car, it's called...THE THING DONT WORK! It will lock your hiney out, flash the lights, and beep the horn...just like a real theft device.
Unfortunately, the next nearest dealer refers these types of operations to, who? The one I took it to, that's who! The one I took it to, according to the service invoice "Recall/CSN1(KO8: Safety Recall KO8-Wireless Ignition Node Reveiver) O8KO8182 Safety Recall KO8-Replace Ignition Node Reciever (1-Semi Skilled) 111 W 0.80 1 CBAOK081AA Module-Wireless Ignition Node 98814 recall ko8 Replace Win Module and program key fob LO#O8KO8182 .8 Hrs and LO# 08KO8150 .1 hrs". If this means anything to anyone else...great... to me it's double talk.
Now, you know as much as I do about the situation. Thanksfor your the input, but, I can say one thing...I will never, ever buy another Dodge product. That is, provided I can get another car manufacturer to take this thing off my hands. Maybe a good old Japanese/Made in America Toyota or Mitsubishi dealer will takeit...who knows?
Again, Thanks.
Sincerely, "honk, flash, and lock."

Recall problems with Wireless Ignition Node
  Member6284

Defintely not related to the airbag recall or keyfob recall.

Is there a security system on the car? If so, my guess is that's going haywire. If no security system, your ECM is not properly recognizing the keyfob, or perhaps the fob needs a new battery. The newer (2011+) Chargers use 5 proximity sensor to "find" the keyfob, but you just press the start button. Much nicer design.

First step would be to try a different dealership. Explain the problem (s) and see what they might charge to diagnose it. A simple reflash or even just a new keyfob battery might take care of things.

Recall problems with Wireless Ignition Node
  apacheone

The actual problem is that the car will continuouslylock the doors, flash lights, and beep horn as long as I am within 20-30 feet from it with the keyfob on my person. I can leavethe fobin the house, wrap it in tin foil, as long as it is not on my person. It's an embarrasment when I go in to a store, or anywhere else for that matter, and people will wonder what's with that car ? This was reported to the dealer, before I took it to them, and that is when I found out about the recall, as well as one on each of the driver and passenger airbags. The service manager said the matter was resolved, but, it was not resolved. A month later, I contacted him, personally, to tell him that the problem was not fixed, that's when he got kinda snotty and wanted to throw a "diagnostic fee" at me.
I am in my late 60s, and can remember actually having to check tire pressure, lock and unlock doors, turn off the lights, and only use the horn to share my discontent with other drivers. If I could find a car that was actually user friendly... get your hands dirty and fix it yourself... I would gladly give up this "smart" car. Thanks for your response 6248.

Recall problems with Wireless Ignition Node
  Member6284

Your question is about a fuse, but your problem is with your keyless entry.

According to the NHTSA website, the recall had to do with being able to remove the keyfob from it's receptacle before placing the car in park.

Since you did not indicate what your actual problem is, the best I can offer is Fuse #8 in the rear fuse block in the trunk. Removing the fuse would not solve any problems, however.

If you're

Recall problems with Wireless Ignition Node