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  LectroFuel

Usually Toyota hybrid batteries need to be replaced when they are 10-12 years old. If the battery was replaced recently then go for it. If not, you'll need to pay around two grand to replace it soon, so factor that into the price. Personally, I wouldn't go for it. That's a lot of money. If you can deal with a little less space, the Prius is more reliable and a better value. Also gets twice the mileage at least compared to the hybrid Highlander.

Hybrid Battery Question - Highlander Hybrid
  LectroFuel

Honestly, I'd get the 2nd gen 2006 that you found. The 3rd gen was not quite as reliable, but still good. If you are looking for better safety, more modern features and interior, then look for a newer generation. With the 2006 you'll be getting an old reliable car in good condition, which is a good thing in my book.

My nextdoor neighbor has a 2015 CR-V and it has the idle vibration issue that is so common in those. She doesn't like her car. My other neighbor likes their 2007-2009 CR-V. They also have a VW Atlas and they still use the CR-V to tow small trailers because they know it'll make the trip. The third gen does have the A/C issues.

2006 Honda Crv Reliability?
  LectroFuel

All of those are good except the Hyundai Santa Fe, which is probably too old based on a $10k budget. Also look at a Mazda CX-5 and Toyota Highlander.

safe reliable car for wife
  LectroFuel

Any year Toyota Highlander (available in hybrid), 2006 or newer Honda Pilot (excluding 2009-2010), 2016 or newer Kia Sorento. If you want a smaller SUV, then 2009 or newer Toyota RAV4, 2007 or newer Honda CR-V, any year Mazda CX-5.

Family suv
  LectroFuel

I think a Mazda3 would be a great option as Michael suggested. Get a 2014 or newer. My younger son has a 2015 i Touring sedan and my older son has a 2017 GT Hatch. Really nice-driving, reliable cars and they look really nice as well. 2017 added some sound deadening and a softer ride. I would recommend those more, but they may not be in your budget.

Also the Prius would be excellent on gas, comfortable, and spacious. However, they hold their value and are expensive used. You'd need to get an early 3rd gen or late 2nd gen most likely, which means that the HV battery will need to be replaced soon. It would be ideal to get one with the battery already replaced. The rest of the car holds up very well. The batteries need to be replaced after 10-12 years regardless of mileage. Mileage doesn't matter much with these, and age does matter. It fulfills your top three requirements.

The Soul and Elantra GT have a stiffer and less composed rides, which was something you didn't want. Otherwise they are great cars and the Soul is spacious inside. They depreciate quickly so they are great on the used market. Reliable, too.

Leather
  AcuraT

My neighbor who owns the 2010 swears by it. We live on a mountain so with snow tires, AWD, and additional ground clearance climbing it while the snow is getting fairly deep is not an issue. The only issue is the cliimate control which failed once after 6 years and is apparently having some problems again at 10 years - and he is considering getting rid of the car for a new one.

According to Consumer Reports the 2006 is pretty reliable still. There are no below average catagories and for average repair issues you only have Climate System, suspension, brakes, and power equipment. Overall reliablity is above average for the year.

For the 2010 the overall reliablity is still above average but the climate controls are the worst rating of way below average (which my neighbor shares that setiment), and body integrity is average (squeaks and rattles).

Overall, for used cars they are pretty good values. I would have a mechanic check it out and one time I posted a list you can use to check it out pretty well yourself - but it did not post well on this site. Best of luck.

2006 Honda Crv Reliability?
  mkaresh

Seat comfort is highly subjective and dependent on your particular size and shape. I'd drive a bunch of them, including the Toyota and Honda but also the Kia Sedona and Chrysler Pacifica, and see which one you find most comfortable. I've personally had the most issues with Honda seats. I found the Kia the sportiest to drive of the bunch, if this matters. But it also has the smallest cargo area. The Chrysler is the most versatile, as you can fold both rows into the floor, but is also the most likely to require repairs. The Dodge Grand Caravan is the oldest design, but partly because it's been in production for over a decade has pretty good reliability. As with the Chrysler you can fold both seats into the floor. As a used car they should be relatively cheap. If you don't mind its blah stying, it could be your best bet.

Comfortable, comfortable, comfortable
  mkaresh

To a large extent this is going to depend on what you find beautiful.

If you can find one, a Suzuki Kizashi might be your best bet. I am a little concerned about the long-term reliability of its CVT transmission. If you'd be willing to buy one with a manual transmission, you'd have a car that is more fun to drive and less likely to require an expensive repair. A second option is a circa-2010 Ford Fusion or the equivalent Mercury Milan. The Fusion was offered in a Sport trim, though quite possibly this one will be out of your price range. The smaller Ford Focus can also be a very good buy, but I would only get the 2012 or newer with a manual transmission--the dual-clutch automatic is trouble-prone.

fun car
  mkaresh

Actually, the problem is more the number of viable options rather than the lack of them. Focusing on hatchbacks as likely to give you the most bang for your buck, one that comes to mind is a 2014 or newer Mazda3 Touring. Vinyl seats, very good fuel economy, and above-average reliability. You might even be able to find a 2017 within your price range.

Other possibilities include the Hyundai Elantra GT (2014 or later), Kia Soul (2014 or later), and Toyota Prius (you'd have to buy a relatively old example of the last to be within your price cap).

Leather
  LectroFuel

It won't feel quite the same as a hydraulic system, but automakers do their best to replicate the feel of hydraulic systems. If steering feel is your main concern, you shouldn't look at SUVs.

reliability
  LectroFuel

I think you should take a look at the new Lincoln Aviator or Lincoln Corsair with individual separate extending thigh support adjustments. Reliability will likely not be great, but neither are the German cars. Within the last couple years Lincoln has gotten pretty good while Cadillac is still part-sharing with the rest of the mainstream GM lineup (we see this with the XT6 among many others). I would skip the Cadillacs and GM cars as they are not class leading right now except they have decent space on the inside. The brands mentioned so far also don't have Lexus-like reliability.

Audis might be good. I personally think they have stiff-feeling seats. That might be a problem for you. If you want soft seats, Lexus has some. Look at the refreshed 2020 RX for that.

Acuras aren't as reliable as they used to be, but you might like the RDX. It was my wife's second favorite interior at the LA auto show. I really think they did a good job with it. If they could improve the rest of their lineup it would really help Acura.

I looked on Consumer Reports for front leg room measurements and found that some compact Luxury SUVs (BMW X3 and Mercedes GLC) have more front seat leg room and head room than the Audi Q7 because the compact SUVs don't have a third row. You might not want to spend so much to get a big SUV like the Q7 that you won't utilize. The Corsair doesn't have a lot of front leg room. You can probably but the wheelchair in the trunk with a back seat folded.

On your list of cars, I would go with a Q7 or Q5. The most reliable on that list would likely be the Audi, but then you would have to pay a lot for maintenance like you probably know. The Grand Cherokee is the cheapest to fix, but the quality just isn't there. The Cadillacs are pretty cheap to fix as well with their V6s, but will likely break more often.

Don't get the Audi Q8. It is a Q7 with reduced interior room and a higher price.

Getting a CPO Q7 or Q5 off lease would probably be a great buy, since usually automakers give a 7 year 100k mile powertrain warranty from original purchase date and mileage.

SUV with long front legroom
  AcuraT

The cars you list are:Cadillac XT5 or XT6, Audi Q8, Q7, and maybe Q5 and Jeep Grand Cherokee

First, elminate the Jeep. Their reliability is horrible and even worse it seems since Fiat took it over. This is according to everything online including Consumer Reports.

Next up is Cadillac. Better than Jeep, but they do have a lot of electrical issues. The only saving grace is the CT6 is based on the same platform as the Buick Enclave, GMC Arcadia, and Chevrolet Traverse. They are all based on the new GM C1 platform of different lengths. Electrical issues have been reported but the power train generally speaking is fine.

Last comes the Audi. They have been working on their reliablity for some time now. Still not as good as Lexus, but it is better than the above options. If you are restircting yourself to these options, it is the most reliable brand. Since you already found one at discount I would go with that.

Best of luck.


SUV with long front legroom
  AcuraT

There are a couple of causes reported online for this. One is that the OnStar unit is malfunctioning and it needs to be fixed. The other is a random beep tone that lasts from a few seconds to serveral minutes, espeically when starting the car. It has been traced to the Bose amplifer (driver side trunk) where a new one from the dealer costs $700, but you maybe able to find it cheaper on eBay or something like that.

I picked this up from a BING search, so take it for what is worth. This is from different reports online. Best of luck.

https://www.bing.com/search?q=2006+cadillac+sts+cause+for+a+high-pitched+alarm+sound+that+through+the+stereo+speakers&form=EDGTCT&qs=PF&cvid=4dfa310a813141c8aea141ad00c29e79&refig=3748d854120643c0f624b41d4ec0adf4&cc=US&setlang=en-US&plvar=0


noise problem
  LV

The 5.4L has been a problem engine for Ford. The reason they no longer make it. The oil pressure spark advance technology in the Triton engine was unreliable. Class action law suits were attempted. Ford buried the problem when they realized no fix was possible, hence the new Coyote 5.0L. Talk to any knowledgeable mechanic and he will tell you to avoid ANY Ford with a 5.4L engine

Member Vehicle Review
  LectroFuel

It likely won't be as reliable as a Lexus, but the powertrain will probably be relatively reliable as it is a basic 3.6L naturally aspirated V6. They use that engine in a lot of GM products. I would only worry about electronic glitches, as Cadillac has been getting more reports of electrical problems as of recent. If you want something more reliable, look for a Lexus NX which is also available in a hybrid. Neither the Cadillac or Lexus are that good in their segment, but the Lexus at least has reliability to brag about. Don't get the 2017 XT5 because that was the first model year when they had many problems.

Reliability and inssurance cost
  LectroFuel

Honda Odyssey and Toyota Sienna. Yeah, minivans are more efficient in interior packaging and are easier to live with than an SUV unless you need to off-road. However, most of the 3 row SUVs now are just boxy minivans.

The new Odyssey, 2018 and newer, has been having some electrical and infotainment issues. 2011-2017 Odyssey is likely to be a little less reliable than the Sienna. There isn't really anything wrong with any year of the Sienna, so I would go with that. 2015 and newer was a slight refresh and I would recommend those years.

I personally like the interior and feeling of the Odysseys more, so I would go with the Honda. But for people who put reliability first, they should get the Sienna.

Comfortable, comfortable, comfortable
  AcuraT

Because this site no longer updates the data on reliablity. They stopped about a year ago. They keep historical records but that is it (and current users can update their reliablity on existing cars, but that is all). Otherwise it just has the host's reviews and bulletin boards to respond to questions.

Why is there limited info for Mercedes
  ejulien6

I second the Mazda CX-5 but have a couple other choices you should consider. All have pretty attractive exteriors, interiors, feel premium and can be found loaded well within the parameters you specify.

2016-2018 Acura RDX
2017-2018 Ford Edge
2016-2018 Hyundai Santa Fe Sport


small SUV, good MPG, premium
  ejulien6

All.of these can be found for 10k or less, are fun to drive, reliable, have low maintenance costs. All except the Crosstour are available with a manual transmissions as well.

Mazda 3 hatchback.
Mazda CX5
Honda Crosstour
Lancer Sportback or sedan in GTS trim with manual.
Honda CRZ.
Acura TSX sedan or wagon.
Hyundai Veloster
Fiesta ST

Lower cost tool carrier/commuter
  ejulien6

All.of these can be found for 10k or less, are fun to drive, reliable, have low maintenance costs and are available with manual transmissions. As far as cabin quietness, there's nothing a little dynamatt can't fix.

Mazda 3 hatchback.
Lancer Sportback or sedan in GTS trim with manual.
Honda CRZ.
Acura TSX sedan or wagon.
Hyundai Veloster
Fiesta ST




Reliable, fun car for highway driving
  LectroFuel

I think a Toyota Matrix would be the most reliable and give you some cargo room. I wouldn't be suprised to find that a Prius has more cargo room than a Matrix. It is amazing to see what people can fit in the trunk of a Prius and you'll be saving gas. Some other choices would be the Honda CR-V and Toyota RAV4. If you need something bigger then the Toyota Highlander would be the most reliable. I'm just going based off your need for reliability and space because you didn't mention any other preferences.

Lower cost tool carrier/commuter
  LectroFuel

If your budget is $10k then I don't think there is much out there that matches your description. If the car is mostly highway driving does it need to be fun to drive or quiet? Those are usually two ends of the spectrum. I would say quietness is more important so I would just get a Prius and it would fit all of your needs except for the fun to drive part. It is decently quiet, specifically compared to an older Civic or Mazda3 which I recommend also.

If your budget is $100k like you stated then I think a Lexus, Genesis, or Tesla would be the best bet because of reliability. Lexus ES (comes in a hybrid also) is too close in comfort to an LS now to justify the LS' huge price increase. A Genesis G90 is super comfortable and quiet and there are many reasons to go with the Tesla although they are not the most luxurious.

Reliable, fun car for highway driving
  NormT

Toyota's are just too expensive today!


My Regal TourX 2.0T with torque vectoring AWD can see almost 40 mpg at 65 mph all for middle $20's with discounting. The TourX drives like a better handling car that it is based on, is quieter offering almost 300 lb-ft of torque, and offers a longer warranty than does Toyota.



Even the Equinox diesel offers better fuel economy for long highway trips than does the RAV4 Hybrid.




"During our testing, the front-drive (Equinox 1.6t diesel)model was put through Real MPG's evaluations, and the results were an impressive 33.1/46.7 mpg, making this oil-burning family car one of the most fuel-efficient crossovers we've tested." Motor Trend

2019 Toyota RAV4 Hybrid Review
  NormT

We have the similar Acafia Limited which was the last of the big version on lease. It is my wife's daily driver and is a very big vehicle to park and drive as it is almost 5,000 lbs.



We can see 26 mpg at 65 mph on long drives fully loaded which is very good. Ours is a Limited or SLT but has Denali details minus grill and vent leather seats. The entry and seating position is huge. You sort of get in and close the door and then keep moving to the center of the seat. The heads up display is nice so you don't have to look at the instrument panel. Outward visibility is good but the height with the antenna will not allow it to fit into our older garage.



The NAV and bluetooth work great with our Samsung S7 phones. The twin AC with one in the rear really cool the car down quickly which great for the dogs on hot days as their is a ceiling vent above each seating position.



At almost 40,000 miles we have not had a problem with the Acadia and recently used up the free oil/tire rotations so cost is very low. We have an extra set of wheels with tires a d TPMS I picked up for $500 so we wkbt need to spend $1,100.00 on replacement tires at lease return.



The over 25% off MSRP makes this the best bang for the buck and the largest crossover you can buy!

Great handling and interior space
  pdautel

I have owned a 2019 Santa Fe 2.4L for about 16 months. I haven't had any problems. However, I recently received a notice from Hyundai that required me to have the dealer install listening software to detect possible engine problems.

The possibility of engine failure is concerning, even though Hyundai extended the warranty. Reluctantly, I have decided to trade it in. I don't know what I'll buy next....

Restyled SUV with great safety features, have owned since Oct 2018 now 4700 miles.

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