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  LectroFuel

It likely won't be as reliable as a Lexus, but the powertrain will probably be relatively reliable as it is a basic 3.6L naturally aspirated V6. They use that engine in a lot of GM products. I would only worry about electronic glitches, as Cadillac has been getting more reports of electrical problems as of recent. If you want something more reliable, look for a Lexus NX which is also available in a hybrid. Neither the Cadillac or Lexus are that good in their segment, but the Lexus at least has reliability to brag about. Don't get the 2017 XT5 because that was the first model year when they had many problems.

Reliability and inssurance cost
  LectroFuel

Honda Odyssey and Toyota Sienna. Yeah, minivans are more efficient in interior packaging and are easier to live with than an SUV unless you need to off-road. However, most of the 3 row SUVs now are just boxy minivans.

The new Odyssey, 2018 and newer, has been having some electrical and infotainment issues. 2011-2017 Odyssey is likely to be a little less reliable than the Sienna. There isn't really anything wrong with any year of the Sienna, so I would go with that. 2015 and newer was a slight refresh and I would recommend those years.

I personally like the interior and feeling of the Odysseys more, so I would go with the Honda. But for people who put reliability first, they should get the Sienna.

Comfortable, comfortable, comfortable
  AcuraT

Because this site no longer updates the data on reliablity. They stopped about a year ago. They keep historical records but that is it (and current users can update their reliablity on existing cars, but that is all). Otherwise it just has the host's reviews and bulletin boards to respond to questions.

Why is there limited info for Mercedes
  ejulien6

I second the Mazda CX-5 but have a couple other choices you should consider. All have pretty attractive exteriors, interiors, feel premium and can be found loaded well within the parameters you specify.

2016-2018 Acura RDX
2017-2018 Ford Edge
2016-2018 Hyundai Santa Fe Sport


small SUV, good MPG, premium
  ejulien6

All.of these can be found for 10k or less, are fun to drive, reliable, have low maintenance costs. All except the Crosstour are available with a manual transmissions as well.

Mazda 3 hatchback.
Mazda CX5
Honda Crosstour
Lancer Sportback or sedan in GTS trim with manual.
Honda CRZ.
Acura TSX sedan or wagon.
Hyundai Veloster
Fiesta ST

Lower cost tool carrier/commuter
  ejulien6

All.of these can be found for 10k or less, are fun to drive, reliable, have low maintenance costs and are available with manual transmissions. As far as cabin quietness, there's nothing a little dynamatt can't fix.

Mazda 3 hatchback.
Lancer Sportback or sedan in GTS trim with manual.
Honda CRZ.
Acura TSX sedan or wagon.
Hyundai Veloster
Fiesta ST




Reliable, fun car for highway driving
  LectroFuel

I think a Toyota Matrix would be the most reliable and give you some cargo room. I wouldn't be suprised to find that a Prius has more cargo room than a Matrix. It is amazing to see what people can fit in the trunk of a Prius and you'll be saving gas. Some other choices would be the Honda CR-V and Toyota RAV4. If you need something bigger then the Toyota Highlander would be the most reliable. I'm just going based off your need for reliability and space because you didn't mention any other preferences.

Lower cost tool carrier/commuter
  LectroFuel

If your budget is $10k then I don't think there is much out there that matches your description. If the car is mostly highway driving does it need to be fun to drive or quiet? Those are usually two ends of the spectrum. I would say quietness is more important so I would just get a Prius and it would fit all of your needs except for the fun to drive part. It is decently quiet, specifically compared to an older Civic or Mazda3 which I recommend also.

If your budget is $100k like you stated then I think a Lexus, Genesis, or Tesla would be the best bet because of reliability. Lexus ES (comes in a hybrid also) is too close in comfort to an LS now to justify the LS' huge price increase. A Genesis G90 is super comfortable and quiet and there are many reasons to go with the Tesla although they are not the most luxurious.

Reliable, fun car for highway driving
  NormT

Toyota's are just too expensive today!


My Regal TourX 2.0T with torque vectoring AWD can see almost 40 mpg at 65 mph all for middle $20's with discounting. The TourX drives like a better handling car that it is based on, is quieter offering almost 300 lb-ft of torque, and offers a longer warranty than does Toyota.



Even the Equinox diesel offers better fuel economy for long highway trips than does the RAV4 Hybrid.




"During our testing, the front-drive (Equinox 1.6t diesel)model was put through Real MPG's evaluations, and the results were an impressive 33.1/46.7 mpg, making this oil-burning family car one of the most fuel-efficient crossovers we've tested." Motor Trend

2019 Toyota RAV4 Hybrid Review
  NormT

We have the similar Acafia Limited which was the last of the big version on lease. It is my wife's daily driver and is a very big vehicle to park and drive as it is almost 5,000 lbs.



We can see 26 mpg at 65 mph on long drives fully loaded which is very good. Ours is a Limited or SLT but has Denali details minus grill and vent leather seats. The entry and seating position is huge. You sort of get in and close the door and then keep moving to the center of the seat. The heads up display is nice so you don't have to look at the instrument panel. Outward visibility is good but the height with the antenna will not allow it to fit into our older garage.



The NAV and bluetooth work great with our Samsung S7 phones. The twin AC with one in the rear really cool the car down quickly which great for the dogs on hot days as their is a ceiling vent above each seating position.



At almost 40,000 miles we have not had a problem with the Acadia and recently used up the free oil/tire rotations so cost is very low. We have an extra set of wheels with tires a d TPMS I picked up for $500 so we wkbt need to spend $1,100.00 on replacement tires at lease return.



The over 25% off MSRP makes this the best bang for the buck and the largest crossover you can buy!

Great handling and interior space
  pdautel

I have owned a 2019 Santa Fe 2.4L for about 16 months. I haven't had any problems. However, I recently received a notice from Hyundai that required me to have the dealer install listening software to detect possible engine problems.

The possibility of engine failure is concerning, even though Hyundai extended the warranty. Reluctantly, I have decided to trade it in. I don't know what I'll buy next....

Restyled SUV with great safety features, have owned since Oct 2018 now 4700 miles.

  LectroFuel

I think crac0018 had a good suggestion with the Infiniti G. They were fun and pretty reliable. I wouldn't get either the Dodge or BMW because they are likely to be less reliable. With a budget of $7k you need to decide if you should reserve money for repairs if you buy a BMW. You could easily spend more than the BMW is worth just on maintenance alone. I don't think a RWD Charger would perform well on snow, but the BMW should be pretty good. I think a Hyundai Genesis could also be fun, but more in a straight line than the turns. If I was in your position, I would probably get an Accord V6. They had precise steering and powerful engines and do pretty much everything well while being reliable and cheap to fix. More fun than a Camry and won't rust out like some old Mazdas.

Need support to decide: BMW 3 328Xi 2011 or Dodge Charger 2008-2012
  crac0018

I probably wouldn't consider an older BMW in that price range if maintenance costs/reliability are a concern. Unless you don't mind doing the work yourself. I've never owned a BMW so I can't comment on actual experience, only what I hear/read.

I have a cousin who lives in Michigan who owned SRT Charger until it went down an embankment one snowy night. He mostly loved the car with the exception of having to drive it during the winter (rear-wheel drive). He replaced it with an all-wheel drive R/T Charger and still loves it and never mentioned anything other than maintenance being needed. I should note, however, that part of my family has employment ties to the auto industry and their thoughts on American cars are probably biased. I guess my only comment on a Charger would be to get an AWD model. Reviews here show a mixed bag as far as reliability goes - looks like it is dependent on the model year.

I don't think you meant to say you're interested in driving "boring" cars. If you did, you should definitely consider other makes/models. Maybe an AWD Infiniti G? There should be plenty in your price range. I've owned Infiniti in the past and found it to be enjoyable and relatively trouble free.

Need support to decide: BMW 3 328Xi 2011 or Dodge Charger 2008-2012
  LectroFuel

I don't think you should be worried about the oil dilution. The problem pops up usually when you have short trips in cold weather, but since your engine will be warmed up throughout the entire trip you should be fine. It is otherwise one of the best engines in the segment. Tons of people have this engine in their cars. The Accord, Civic, and CR-V all use it.

If you still are worried, look at the other SUVs like the RAV4, CX-5, and Subaru Forester. The RAV4 should be best for most people.

2.4 L Reliablilty - Specifically Oil Dilution
  NormT

The Equinox AWD 9-speed 2LT with cloth seats can be had for upper $20's discounted if you wanted a stripped 250 horsepower hot rod compact SUV. The Equinox AWD Premier 2.0T with leather and other features is low $30's. None of them will have a near-luxury interior but are quiet and ride very smoothly.



The Buick Envision 2.0T with torque vectoring AWD is the bargain at low $30's discounted offering crisp traffic alert, leather heated seats and steering wheel. The Envision offers sliding and reclining rear seat and tri-zone climate control which is hard to beat at this price.

2019 Mazda CX-5 Signature Turbo Review
  Member378

I can only speak to the standard Stelvio, which I had a few times as a loaner. It was a very nice car to drive around in, not really a useful SUV. Cargo area too small and too high for my big lazy dogs who wouldn't jump in. But the four seats were very nicely appointed and PLENTY of room for four adults. I would say they compromised the cargo area for rear sit comfort a bit.
I enjoyed sitting in it more than my wife's Guilia. Much roomier and more comfortable. I enjoyed driving the Guilia more. The dig on Alfa interiors is that they're not up to BMW or AUDI quality, and that may be true, but I don't think the interiors of the GErman cars are that great, or as good as they were, I guess. I'd agree, though, the Alfa seems be a little cheaper; that the QF doesn't seem upgraded is an oversight.

One thing I really likes was the big shift paddles on both the Stelvio and the Guilia. I'd love to try to drive the QF and that neat 90 V-6. I'd also like Alfa to succeed here and bring something like the Gulietta over here, but that will never happen even if they do pull this out.



2019 Alfa Romeo Stelvio Quadrifoglio Review
  LectroFuel

If you want reliability, fuel economy, and good overall quality, you should look into the Lexus ES 300h. There are also slightly used cars like the BMW 530e plug-in and Mercedes GLC 350e that are good if you care less about reliability, but want the German feel and fuel efficiency.

The Tesla Model 3 is also a good choice, but isn't for everyone. It fulfills your requirements. I haven't heard of many reliability problems with it lately. Quality has improved A LOT since they first went on sale. You'll also be using no gas at all and have instant torque.

If you could provide more information it would be helpful because most cars fall in your requirements.

Reliable Car for Retiree
  LectroFuel

Pretty much any SUV can tow 1600 pounds. I would get a Hyundai Palisade or Kia Telluride. Those are the top two midsized SUVs right now. They thought of everything with those SUVs. The Jeep feels less modern than the Kia and Hyundai and probably will have more reliability problems.

Tow Vehicle
  LectroFuel

I think the Mazda CX-5 should be at the top of your list. It gives you some luxury and won't break the bank in the purchase price or maintenance costs. As long as you go 2017 or newer it should be quiet inside. I recommend going for the Grand Touring or Signature trims even if that means going used.

The BMW will likely have some problems down the road and the Lexus hybrid should be very reliable and efficient.

I am not a big fan of the NX because it is based on the old RAV4. Not a very dynamic car and it feels old inside. The infotainment system on Lexuses are the worst in the industry also.

small SUV, good MPG, premium
  LectroFuel

Don't buy a Jaguar if you are looking for reliability. Any other brand should be more reliable. My parents used to have Jags and I had one. I had a 2000 3.0 S-Type and something would break on it every few months costing $500 for each trip. Mostly water pumps and the windows would fall into the doors or get stuck. Mine got to 150,000 miles across 4 years because my commute was longer. My dad's 2003 S-Type got to 140,000 miles across 11 years and had a few major problems ending with a transmission failure. My mom's 2002 XJ8 was the least reliable of them all, but was a true Jag and not a Lincoln LS rebadge. That car had a lot of major problems also ending its life in the failure of the transmission.

Of course this is not something to keep in mind since I'm only one person that used to have an old Jag. You should research Jaguar as a brand and see that they are garbage quality.

All of your priorities would be fullfilled in a Genesis or Lexus. They all have smooth rides and good reliability.

Jaguar XF 2018 Reliability Search
  LectroFuel

A 2016 or newer Mazda 6 with the Mazda Connect infotainment system is what you should be looking at. Very efficient compared to cars in its class, looks good, handles great, and it has a 6 speed auto. They depreciate more than Hondas and some other brands, so it should be easy to find a loaded model in your budget. If you get that Connect infotainment system, there is a retrofit available to add CarPlay and Android Auto.

The new Accords are too expensive for a decent trim and the previous gen IIRC didn't handle as well as the new ones.. A Stinger won't be much better on gas than a Mustang, but you might like it. A used Acura TLX might be more your style. I'm not a fan of the car, but it is a cheap luxury car on the used market and that makes it appealing for a lot of people.

Economical Sporty Sedan
  Member3222

I loved my Crosstrek. Bullet-proof reliability for 48000 miles. Never felt it was underpowered and rarely felt left behind at a changine light. Power was totally adequate for day-to-day use, if you want a race car get something different.

My only reason for getting rid of this car was the need to haul seven people on a long trip. I miss my fuel economy and maneuverability!

Only gripe: voice commands for phone were painfully slow to load. Three times nav glitched and required restart of car (to reboot the system).

Subaru Crosstrek??
  AcuraT

Congrats on the good choice danlisahall. I hope you get what you want out of that choice, thank you for sharing.

I have a friend with a Volt who changes his oil every 7500 miles with limited engine use and it works fine after 100,000 miles. He owns the 2013 so now it is 6 years old and still going strong. I have another friend with a newer Volt (2017) who changes it at the same interval as recommended and has no issues. I don't take chances delaying the oil change on any car I own, but then again, I have never owned a full hybrid. I also don't feel the urge to replace any car before 10 years and 140,000 miles at minimum, unless it is having severe problems.

Is the Kia Niro a hero?
  AcuraT

Just note the Prius C due to lack of demand will end with the 2019 model year. If you don't care about that, buy it as it will be cheap at the end of the year (now) as it won't be made anymore. The Prius is not selling either but Toyota just redesigned it and added AWD with electric motors (not selling either). I assume Toyota will offer it for a couple of more years before throwiing in the towel on it if it continues not to sell.

The future is self-driving cars but I think we are still at least 5 or 6 years away before we see what happens next with that.

Next tech investment - electric or plug in hybrid? Or???
  AcuraT

To be more exactly, those before 2010 had head gasket issues. Those 2010 and later have oil consumption issues, but not head gasket issues due to the redesign of the head gasket. On those later model cars the head gasket can last up to 200,000 with no problem.

I own a 2013 Subaru Legacy which is the sedan twin of the car you are considerin since it was redesigned in 2010 at the same time the Outback was (and redesigned again in 2015). The only issue I have had after 91,000 starting at 44,000 was limited oil consumption. So now I add one quart of oil before I change the oil every 5000 miles and it runs fine. Note I have had ZERO issues besides that on my loaded 3.6R Legacy. It is great in the snow.

Now if a constant oil consumption would drive you crazy, steer clear. Otherwise I would say buying a 2010-2012 Outback should be generally speaking a good car to own since the gasket issue is non-existant on those model years.

Finally, they are not terribly hard to work on but note, they do have a boxer engine so the cylinders are on the side, not in the V pattern orline inline pattern. Also note particularly on the H6 and less on the H4, the rear spark plug on the driver's side is hard to replace - because you have to replace it by feel and a rachet wrench that has a 90 degree angle joint to reach in and get the spark plug out - every 100,000 miles.

Best of luck.

Questions for Outback owners
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