We are 108,000+ car owners sharing real-world car information.

Join Us

RDX vs MKX

The Right Car for Me | TrueDelta

Celt

I am looking at CPO RDX and MDX, my preference being a bit larger than smaller. I plan to keep it well over a decade and will put less than 6K miles annually on it. I am coming out of a 2011 Jeep Wrangler 6 speed.

Must haves:
Sunroof
V6
1:15 power to weight ratio as minimum
Leather or "leatherette" seating
Lighter exterior or red
Light to medium interior
Superior CPO warranty and reliability
Less than 190" overall length
Ability to run on regular unleaded gas (premium recommended but regular is allowed is ok)
Entry Lux or better feeling
0-60 mph < 7 seconds

Must not have:
Turbo or supercharger
Black/very dark exterior or interior
Less than superior repair record
CVT
Subcompact rating
Premium leaded gas requirement


Mostly unconcerned with:
Fuel economy
Future resale value
Corrosion warranty

Prefer not to have:
AWD
Peripheral electronics e.g. Nav, Lane warning, cameras, touch screens etc. Regular knobs and buttons that can be felt and manipulated without having to look at them are preferred.

Priorities: Reliability & durability / Warranty, maintenance cost / Driving position & visibility

Need minimum of 5 seats

Will consider both new and used cars
Maximum mileage: 30000
Maximum age: 2 years

Maximum price: US $ 31000

« Return to results

Sort responses by likes

Response from NormT

8:12 pm September 17, 2017

Most CPO warranties are stretched to about 6-7 years, so it'll be a little short of you wanting a decade of ownership. That is something to consider in ownership costs. Skip the Lexus if you put allot of weight on CPO warranties as the not transferable from orginal owner. The problem you run into between 7-10 years is when the repairs start and you won't have a warranty. Another up hill battle is the
newer techonolgy entering luxury cars and then filtering down. So the newer the car the more the tech will invade.

Not sure what unit of weight you are using but all suvs without forced induction will be a 3.5, 3.6, or 3.7l V6 making 300+ horsepower except for Subaru, Acura, Lexus, and a few others. Most of the make 260-280 lb-ft of torque. I recommend looking at a GMC Terrain 3.6l. It's 301 horsepower is more than the RDX and handling and braking bests the Acura in Motor Trend testing. A 2012 Cadillac SRX 3.6l is the year for CUE (Cadillac User Entertainment ) that was first year for touch screen. Another option that is quick with 5.3l V8 is the Chevrolet Tahoe/GMC Yukon. It'll have 335 horsepower and close to 400 lb-ft of torque. The solid axle will share some driving characteristics of your Jeep. Good luck and let us know what fits your prerequisites.

0

Link to this reponse

GMC Terrain
Cadillac SRX
Chevrolet Tahoe / Suburban

Response from zcd1

7:56 am September 22, 2017

It's interesting that the previous responder is so tone-deaf that he all but completely ignored the 2 cars that you said you were considering...he's a GM-only fanboi, and posts the same basic stuff all over every automotive site he can find. Sad.

I've personally owned both an MDX and an RDX, and can vouch for them both being very nice vehicles. They share a V-6, but are built on different platforms and feature different AWD systems (when chosen). At the price point you mentioned, You may not find a current generation MDX, which means AWD is standard - no FWD MDX was available until 2015. The RDX has been available in a FWD version since the current generation debuted. I personally wouldn't forego the AWD, but that's your call, obviously.

The MDX is larger, more refined, more comfortable and arguably more sophisticated due to its SH-AWD (fulll--time AWD with torque-vectoring) system. The RDX, being based on the CR-V platform, is smaller and the AWD system is an on-demand system, meaning FWD until extra traction is needed, when the control system will shunt power to the rear axle.

Despite the larger size, the SH-AWD system makes MDX is the better-handling car, though this isn't so noticeable unless driving at "sportier" speeds. It's also quieter and has some of the most comfortable front seats I've experienced.

The RDX's front seats are also very nice, and it's a nice car to drive, though slightly louder inside due (apparently) to less sound insulation. Since it's the lighter/smaller vehicle, that sonorous V-6 makes the RDX sightly quicker in a straight line, though both are plenty fast enough for most, and both are MUCH quicker than your Jeep...

Both have good cargo space, though the RDX is missing a powered tailgate on the pre-2015 models, which is a bit odd for a "luxury" SUV.

Both are likely to be extremely reliable based on available statistics - we never had any significant issues with either vehicle.

At similar pricing, I'd personally choose a slightly older MDX over the RDX, but you're not going to go wrong with either choice.

2

Link to this reponse

Response from Celt

9:52 am September 22, 2017

I really messed up. When I posed my original question, I used MKX (as in Lincoln) in the subject line, but then I used MDX (as in Acura) in the first line of the body. Acura RDX vs Lincoln MKX is the comparison I am really interested in. Please don't flame the Newbie!

Thanks Everyone.

2

Link to this reponse

Response from NormT

12:46 pm September 22, 2017

Interesting to recommend a vehicle that doesn't fit the responders constraints and then to continue on how nice it even though you just said it was out of budget. Smh...

Not a luxury type review on a Acura RDX posted by a member.
------------------------------------------
"I can say that this is the worst vehicle [bought brand new] that I have ever had. Maybe I am saying this because it was a big disappointment in many areas, especially because I had long term (10+ years) expectations.

The engine is powerful at 273 HP and the vehicle is very fast from 0 to 60 but due to a flawed VCM system the powertrain is not smooth at all. it vibrates between 1200 - 1500 rpm with a subble vibration/characteristic rumble that gets old really fast. At city speeds (stop/go traffic) driving this vehicle is a nightmare with a very jerky trans (ie When coming to a stop and the trans reduces to 2nd and 1st you really feel it as if you are slamming the brakes, not smooth at all). I didnt like this vehicle when taking turns (hot) either, it always felt very unstable; highway speeds? Exactly the same negative experience, very unstable and never felt safe getting it over a certain speed (that should not be mentioned here)

The rear suspension is very noisy and after 10k miles started clunking a bit, specially in cold days. The brakes were very squeaky at the beginning and got better with time but on certain days I would feel the noise when coming to a stop and starting the car again.
The interior design is ok, I like it, sort of, but the quality of the materials is not the best. The road noise is so-so.The NAV is very very slow and it does not convey the idea that this vechicle was built in 2012; it is almost atari like in terms of resolution, very slow in responsiness and not very user friendly.

The reliability is excellent, if you dont count all these problems that I have mentioned [design problems].

I visited the dealerships several times and they always played the normal specs card so had to dump it.Shame on me that I didnt do my homework properly before the purchase of this vehicle. It all resulting in losing considerable money in the process."

0

Link to this reponse

Response from LectroFuel

1:25 am September 24, 2017

zcd1, I agree, bias towards an automaker should not be allowed on this website because it misleads the original poster. He constantly posts GM and it's annoying. This website might as well be called buyaGM.com.

Back to the OP: The RDX perfectly fits your top three priorities, but it is aging and outdated. The RDX is recommended premium, but can take regular gas. I wouldn't risk the engine damage running regular in a premium gas-recommended engine. I wouldn't consider the RDX as a luxury car, but it's priced like one. The interior is inexcusably bad for a luxury SUV and it doesn't handle as well as it should. The RDX used to be a good luxury SUV, but others have far surpassed it. It, however, is one of the only cars that fit your specifications and it's reliable. It has many knobs and buttons in the dash.

The 2016-2017 Lincoln MKX drives better than the RDX in handling, acceleration, quietness, and luxury, but the reliability is not good. The throttle body is notorious for killing the car in its tracks. Many reports of stopping in the middle of the freeway and almost getting killed. They haven't recalled it yet. Typical Ford. The interior controls are easier to use IMO in the MKX than the old RDX. However, there are only two knobs in the Lincoln. Between the Acura and Lincoln, I'd take the Acura for the reliability and brand rep, but honestly I'd never buy either. If you decide on the MKX, look at the Ford Edge because it's the same car basically but cheaper.

The 2017 GMC Terrain is an option, but it's really dated. It looks like a car from 2010 inside and out. It does have the V6 though. Several reviewers have said even the V6 300+hp is not a lot of power for this SUV.

You might like the Hyundai Santa Fe Sport. It is available with a naturally aspirated 4 cylinder or a 2.0T 4 cylinder. The 4 cylinder is actually just as fast as the turbo four. Has a great CPO program like Lexus except that the only warranty is the one that comes with the car from when new (10 years/100,000 miles). Has a good infotainment system that's easy to use. Also, the Kia Sorento is a great SUV. Available with a V6 (and turbo 4) and no CVT, comfortable, easy controls, same warranty as the Hyundai, and nice to drive. I would recommend the Nissan Murano if it didn't have an unreliable CVT.

Probably the best choice is the Lexus RX. Smooth, comfortable, not really techy inside for the previous generation (2010-2015), reliable, luxurious, and has an NA V6. #1 selling luxury car/SUV in America. Might have to go a little older than 2015, but it has a tried and true powertrain. You have a very low chance of having an issue with it. Lexus' CPO warranty is 2 years/unlimited mileage after the 4 year basic new car warranty, so you get up to 6 years/ unlimited miles. Also, they cover dealer maintenance and roadside assistance for 2 years/20,000 miles. Interesting thing I read: If your vehicle has mechanical difficulty while you're away from home, you will be reimbursed for meals and lodging for a maximum of three nights (up to $200 per night) while repairs are performed on your car, in addition to reimbursement for a rental car for up to five days (up to $50 per day). So Lexus has a sweet CPO program.

Pretty much anything will be better than your Wrangler no offense. All these cars are at least OK, but there are definitely some that are better than others like I pointed out. Good luck and tell us what you buy! :)

0

Link to this reponse

Acura RDX
Lexus RX
Kia Sorento

Response from Celt

3:26 pm September 24, 2017

LectroFuel,

Thanks for the detailed and informative response. This is becoming a wait and see situation given that I live in FL Big Bend and estimates of over one million vehicles down here have been affected by bad weather lately.

Also, given the less than average QRD rating of Acura recently published by Edmunds I am inclined to favor the MKX.

I also made note during several of my test drives of the RDX's handling (especially front end wash out at speed when cornering) and its non-lux interior, thinking a Denali out "luxed" it.

I like the fact that the MKX runs happily on regular unleaded and has leather as opposed to synthetic seating.

If you have any other information I would appreciate your sharing.

Best Always,

Celt

1

Link to this reponse

Acura RDX
Lincoln MKX

Response from LectroFuel

6:39 pm September 24, 2017

The MKX was redesigned for 2016. First year redesigns for most automakers usually mean that reliability is worst for that year. This applies to the 2016 MKX. The 2015 was more reliable, but feels old compared to the 2015. It is a matter of if you value reliability over enjoyment I guess.

I was looking at MKX reviews and found this on Car & Driver (they tested the turbo 4 engine, not the V6): It took three attempts with two different vehicles to produce our performance results. The first MKX ran roughly a half-second slower, then illuminated a transmission code and began to stumble at triple-digit speeds. Convinced that the turbocharged MKX was capable of better times, we returned to the track a week later with a second MKX to extract the figures that appear here. That second Lincoln made it through four and a half runs before throwing a different transmission trouble code. A Lincoln rep attributed the hiccups to preproduction trivialities, which is difficult to swallow considering that dealers and customers were taking deliveries concurrently with our tests. It was only two cars but still, both of the new test cars had transmission issues. Doesn't sound promising.

I recommend test driving the 2015 or 2016 Ford Edge with which the MKX shares its platform with. Drives and feels very similar to the MKX and costs much less. You can get a well-optioned Edge for the price of a base MKX. Also worth noting when researching is that the turbo engines are much preffered over the "rough" and "gas gulping" V6. The turbo engines are quieter and deliver more torque at lower RPMs.

With the MKX and Edge, every reviewer raves about the optional 2.7L EcoBoost 4 cylinder. 0-60 under 6 seconds is fast, smooth and effortless.

0

Link to this reponse

Ford Edge

Response from Celt

11:39 am September 27, 2017

Does anyone know if there are any hardware, tuning, or performance differences amongst the various emission standards for the 2016-2017 MKX 3.7L: California (Carb), Green States, 49 States, 50 States, etc? Are there any differences still in existence for those two model years?

I will be registering the MKX in Florida. I know that we don't have emission testing here, but I am trying to figure if any actual hardware / tuning / performance differences exist. It would be helpful for me to rely on facts vs "thinks" or opinions on this one.

Thanks and Best Always,

Celt

0

Link to this reponse

Response from NormT

12:01 pm September 27, 2017

I would contact the manufacturer than relying on the internet. But it sounds like CA does their own testing on any car that is not brand new.

http://www.fordtransitusaforum.com/#/topics/48834

I would go on Lincoln or Ford website and engage in a chat with a representative who can send you documentation from Ford Corporation.

0

Link to this reponse

Response from Celt

1:06 pm September 27, 2017

NormT,

Thanks for the suggestion. I spoke with a great guy at Lincoln Concierge. He said that all 2016 MKXs wear the exact same emission hardware and tuning regardless of how they are labeled. Therefore a California car (CARB car) is the same as a Cross States (border state car) and a Federal car. The only exceptions are emergency and government type applications.

Best Always,

Celt

0

Link to this reponse

Response from LectroFuel

5:43 pm September 28, 2017

There are many strict emissions requirements here in California. It's important to make sure that you check the emissions control label under the hood. It should say "California certified." Here's a CARB checklist:

https://www.arb.ca.gov/msprog/NonCAVeh/NonCAVeh.pdf

0

Link to this reponse

Sign in or join TrueDelta to post your own thoughts.

Return to top

Thanks for your interest in TrueDelta!